shading ducklings

shading ducklings: saratoga: new yorkIt was HOT in Saratoga. Granted I was stupid enough to be wearing jeans, but it was still ridiculously hot. As you can see, any shade was appreciated by the local ducklings. It’s weird, New York has similar summers to Sydney, but it snows in winter, whereas Sydney rarely gets below 5 degrees Celsius.


family of ducks

duck family: saratoga: new yorkThere’s something about ducklings, they’re just nauseatingly cute. So these ones are from my America trip, in the little town of Saratoga in upstate New York. It’s a beautiful town, with a great Indian restaurant.


green tree frog

green tree frog: noosa: queenslandThis guy was sitting right outside my mother’s place in Noosa, Queensland one night. He’s so wonderfully fat, and those perfect martian invader fingerpads – daww.

It’s kinda like wild kingdom there sometimes. One time, I was sitting in the loungeroom working on my computer, and I noticed movement out of the corner of my eye. Going over to investigate there was a baby Blue-Tongue lizard all of 3″ long, which seemed to have walked almost all the way through the house. As soon as he saw me, he raced with his stubby little legs as fast as he could. That would have been a great plan, except for the polished tile floor. He basically sat there, paddling furiously and going nowhere. So I put him outside, after recovering from fits of laughter.


baby snake

baby snake: apple orchard: upstate new yorkHow adorable is that? When I was in America, a friend and I were walking through an orchard (ok we were sortof lost having wandered into the forest) and the apple trees were being irrigated with big rotary sprays – think lawn sprinklers, but huge. Anway as we’re walking down the dirt road I notice something almost underfoot. Looking down I thought “ooh lizard” until the lack of legs became apparent. That was right about when it started striking my boot. Now I know snakes can stretch and unhinge their jaws, but that was perhaps a tad over-ambitious.

UPDATE: according to Dr Pete Ducey of the State University of New York at Cortland, it’s a northern water snake, Nerodia sipedon.


eastern water dragon head

eastern water dragon head: bradley's head: sydneyThose big black profile stripes behind the eyes aren’t just great camouflage, EWDs communicate or make territorial displays by holding their heads up and bobbing them up and down rapidly. It’s hilarious to watch.


eastern water dragon right side

eastern water dragon: bradley's head: sydneyI was about 3 metres (10 feet) away from this guy when shooting this. You know, there’s a reason wildlife photographers use those big fuckoff EOS soulstealing lenses. They do like to watch you when you approach them, keeping an eye pointed in your direction. There’s a reason these are all profile shots.


eastern water dragon

eastern water dragon: bradley's head: sydneyEastern Water Dragons are one of the more kick-ass reptiles in the Sydney area. Growing up to almost a metre long, and with mouths full of needle sharp teeth, they’re everything a predatory lizard should be. You find them in the middle of suburbia, really anywhere that has water and some bushland will be filled with them.


inverted gecko

gecko: noosa: queenslandGeckos who can hang upside down on surfaces. It’s rally amazing how they do this, microscopic hairs that exploit molecular attraction, sort of like atomic velcro.


gecko

gecko: noosa: queenslandOne of the funny things about Queensland is the suburban wildlife. At noosa for example, you have scrub turkeys (imagine a normal turkey, basically a wild version) wandering around the main street in the mornings. The other thing is geckos. Little, tiny, semi-translucent geckos.